Tuesday, July 5, 2016

Squash Blossom Frittata


People are so fascinated with these beautiful flowers that come from the zucchini plant!
They are very pretty, and when fried and stuffed with ricotta, a true delicacy.

I picked them quickly that a.m. and with not much time to think about what to make. A pizza?


Maybe next time.

Today, it will be a frittata, which is basically and omelet finished in the oven.

This recipe is very adaptable. You can use more eggs for a crowd, or less and cook in a smaller pan.

Any cheese is fine....I opted for Parmesan.
Fresh herbs can be your choice, chives, basil or parsley, all good.

Use this recipe as a basic guideline, and you will be fine.

Henry asked me if I opened the flowers up to check for bugs or bees.....I did not.

I am still alive to give you the recipe.


Squash Blossom Frittata: (serves 6)

7 eggs
1/4 cup whole milk
sea salt & pepper
bunch of scallions, chopped
1/2 grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese

Filling:

1 zucchini, sliced
1 small onion, red or yellow, sliced
2 cloves garlic, peeled but left whole
handful of basil, chopped
1 tbsp butter
1 tbsp olive oil
sea salt & pepper
6-8 zucchini blossoms (stems trimmed)

Whisk up egg mixture with the cheese and scallions in a bowl, and set aside.

Heat the oven to 375F.

In a commercial grade non-stick skillet (make sure your skillet is oven safe at high temperatures), heat the butter and olive oil.
Saute the zucchini and onions with the garlic until the zucchini is blistered, about 10 minutes (when the garlic gets too brown, remove it from the pan). Season w/ sea salt & pepper.


Add the egg mixture to the pan and place the zucchini flowers on top in a decorative fashion.
Cook on medium heat for about 2 minutes only, until the bottom is set.

Place in the oven at 375F for 12 minutes, then place under the broiler for 3 minutes more, until the top of the omelet is golden.

Immediately, slide the frittata out of the skillet onto a cutting board and cut into wedges.

Best served at room temperature, and great for leftovers the next day!


Enjoy the bounties of summer!

9 comments:

The JR said...

I love them fried and stuffed. This looks good too.

Carolyn said...

I will have to watch for these at the farmers market. They certainly look beautiful! Do the impart much flavor or are they a gorgeous decoration?

Mollie said...

I too would like to know what the blossoms taste like.

Stacey Snacks said...

Mollie, Carolyn,

Good question.

Truth be told, I don't taste much of any flavor!

They are very delicate. Others might disagree with me.
I love them for their decoration.

Stacey

Mollie said...

Thank you Stacey. I appreciate your thoughts on the taste. They have always intimidated me. I was afraid that if I used them as a decoration they would change the flavor. Maybe now I will try...

Mollie said...

Thank you Stacey. I appreciate your thoughts on the taste. They have always intimidated me. I was afraid that if I used them as a decoration they would change the flavor. Maybe now I will try...

Veena said...

I snorted coffee out of my nose when I read "I'm still alive to give you the recipe"! Looks lovely.

Unknown said...

I made beer battered squash blossoms. I had read the suggestion online to remove the stamen from the flower, which I did, although you do end up ripping the flower a bit in the process. I suppose the stamen may give an off flavor or something? If you pick new blossoms that are still twisted closed, I think the incidence of insects inside will be less. I found none. I used the male flowers (ones with a stem instead of a zucchini attached!)

Unknown said...

I made beer battered squash blossoms. I had read the suggestion online to remove the stamen from the flower, which I did, although you do end up ripping the flower a bit in the process. I suppose the stamen may give an off flavor or something? If you pick new blossoms that are still twisted closed, I think the incidence of insects inside will be less. I found none. I used the male flowers (ones with a stem instead of a zucchini attached!)