Thursday, March 10, 2016

Maple Date Scones

Ah, scones.

So easy to bake, so nice to wake up to in the morning.

There are so many variations of scones, but I have found heavy cream works best for me.

Some people swear by buttermilk, but give me that 36% milk-fat content, along w/ butter, and we have winning scones. Never dry or hard as rocks.

Here, I used Kings Own Brand Maple Syrup, organic and bottled in small batches in Vermont. There is nothing better than using real maple syrup instead of that plastic bottle I grew up with, you know what I'm talking about.

Next time I will add some pecans to the top for a pretty crunch.

Maple Date Scones: (adapted from Dinner w/ Julie)

2 cups all-purpose flour
2 Tbsp. brown sugar
2 tsp. baking powder
1/4 tsp. salt
1/2 cup cold butter, cut into pieces
3/4 cup half & half or heavy cream
2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup
1/2 cup of dates, chopped

1/2 cup confectioners sugar
1 Tbsp. pure maple syrup
1 Tbsp. half & half

Preheat oven to 400F.

In a medium bowl, stir together the flour, brown sugar, baking powder and salt.
I find the best way to incorporate the butter is to grate the cold stick of butter on a cheese grater w/ large holes, much easier than cutting the butter into the flour.

Mix w/ your hands or a pastry cutter until the butter and other ingredients are incorporated. Add in the chopped dates.

Add the half & half and maple syrup and stir just until the dough comes together. Turn out onto a parchment-lined sheet and pat into a circle 1" thick. Cut into 6-8 wedges and pull them apart on the sheet.

If you like, brush them with a little extra milk and sprinkle with sugar.

Bake on a parchment lined (or silpat) for 15-20 minutes, until golden.

Meanwhile, whisk together the icing sugar, maple syrup and cream, and drizzle it over the warm scones with a fork.

Best eaten the same day they are baked, but they freeze beautifully.


Anonymous said...

We are also a family of 2 and love fresh-baked scones, but cannot eat a whole recipe at once. So I bake just 2 or 3 and freeze the rest unbaked . I flash freeze the seperated raw-dough scones on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Once frozen, they can be bagged. Whenever you want a fresh scone they are ready to be baked and need only 3 or 4 minutes longer than the recipe says for the fresh dough. I find no difference in the taste or texture.

Proud Italian Cook said...

I'm weak at the knees just thinking about these!

Alise Clein said...

I am thinking I could substitute maple sugar for the brown just reinforce that maple-y flavor I adore so much, and while I'm at it, throw in a handful of toasted pecans. Thank you for the recipe Stacey - YUM!

Stacey Snacks said...

By all means! I love the sound of maple sugar....and yes to pecans, especially on the top!