Tuesday, February 23, 2010

Tunisian Tuna Tart

tuna tart6

Sounds like a tongue twister: Tunisian Tuna Tart.
Say that 10 times.

I wasn't sure if I wanted to try this recipe, because it did sound odd, but I had leftover preserved lemons and was looking for a recipe in which to use them in.

Trust me, the Tunisian Tuna Tart found on Tastespotting from Tasty Trix blog was Terrific.

Ok, the cute tongue twister nonsense will end now.

This is a fairly simple recipe if you are using a premade pie crust, like Trader Joe's or Whole Foods brand, and I had those wonderful preserved lemons left over from the Israeli Couscous recipe.

The recipe calls for Italian Tonno or Spanish Bonita tuna packed in oil.
Don't substitute albacore packed in water. The imported tuna, though pricier, has such a different flavor and needs no mayonnaise. I eat it straight out of the can.

Warning: This tart looks kind of ugly before going into the oven, and I was skeptical at first glance, mixing tuna w/ heavy cream, but then I remembered a great Italian spread called Spuma di Tonno that I made which everyone loved, so I got over my fears quickly.

Tunisian Tuna Tart: (adapted from Tasty Trix)

9" tart pan with removable bottom is needed for this recipe.

Roll out your pie crust to fit tart pan, keep refrigerated until baking time.

1 preserved lemon, seeds removed and chopped
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 medium onion, diced
2 cans of Italian or Spanish tuna in oil, drained
a few sprigs of fresh thyme, leaves removed

a few oil cured olives, sliced thin for decorating the top

2 eggs
1/3 cup whole milk
1/3 cup heavy cream
black pepper

Mix all ingredients together in a large bowl and add the cream/milk egg mixture and blend with the tuna/onion/lemon mixture.

Sprinkle the top of the tart with some fresh thyme leaves and some sliced olives for decoration.
No salt is needed in this recipe, the lemons and tuna are salty enough.

Bake for 40 minutes in a 375F oven. Let rest 10 minutes before slicing.

Serve with an arugula salad with mustard vinaigrette.
This recipe is a keeper.


T.W. Barritt at Culinary Types said...

If I hadn't seen it here, I would have questioned the idea myself. But I really like the idea of a savory tart made with tuna (which I love). This is an elegant pantry meal.

kat said...

Strangely it sounds really good to me maybe because I like tuna noodle casserole which is creamy tuna

Ciao Chow Linda said...

You're right, it does sound odd, but I'll bet I'd love it. It looks like a nice thing to serve as an appetizer or hors d'ouevre.

The Japanese Redneck said...

The name did turn me off on it at first, but the picture of it is amazing.

The more I thought about it the more I thought it seemed like a fancy crab/tuna type patty/croquet.

George Gaston said...

Stacey, this could become my new tuna casserole comfort food. Many times when I make tuna salad, I will chop up black cured olives and add a tablespoon of grainy mustard. Thanks yo you, you have given me that in "tart form" ~ can't wait to give this a try. Thanks...

lisa said...

I think I saw that on TS too and thought it looked great! I love these all these ingredients. So true about imported tuna being a different thing.

Virtual Poona Blogger said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Virtual Poona Blogger said...

Sorry Stacey, it was on the tip of my tongue and I just had to let it all out:

'Those Tunisian Tuna Tarts totally tantalize the taste buds. Take that, tongue-twisters'

Bob said...

I didn't know that about the imported tuna, I have to get some. The tart looks awesome, heh the ingredients are a lot like my tuna salad only without mayo and with eggs and cream. :D

doggybloggy said...

cream and tuna? sacre bleu - but it does look good!

A Feast for the Eyes said...

The Queen of Tarts has done it again. I have never tried the tuna you talk about, but I'm going to scout some out. I'd like to taste the difference, and get over my hesitation to cook with canned tuna. Yours looks worth trying.

citronetvanille said...

I have seen this one on Tracey's blog, and it sure does look great, and you're right you need the Italian tuna sott'olio that has a unique flavor. Beautiful tart!

Proud Italian Cook said...

This would be nice for lunch with the girls, but I still can't find preserved lemons!

Trix said...

Your tart turned out beautifully, I'm so flattered that you tried it!

Eileen said...

Tuna packed in olive oil and olives... YUM!